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Justin Townes Earle, Cory Chisel
Cory Chisel
Justin Townes Earle
Jan 8, 2013 at 8:00 PM
Ticket sales ended Jan 9, 2013 3:00 AM. Additional tickets may be available at the box office.
Tickets on sale Friday October 26th at 12:00 p.m. Justin Townes Earle is relentless in his quest for finding the best way to communicate the emotions coursing through him. As fans, we benefit in a huge way – treated to an artist that is always in flux, always expanding an d contracting different aspects of his work. His latest album, ‘Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now’ was recorded in an Asheville church, and is a tack towards the Soulful sounds of Memphis. Unlike many other musicians, JTE not just refuses, but actively fights against settling into a vein of music expression – and we, as listeners, benefit in a big way. Join us on January 8th to bring in the new year with a musician that has been on a skyward trajectory since winning the 2011 American Music Awards Song of the Year. Tickets are $15 advance.
- 18+ Show -
Music : Genre: Acoustic,Alt. Country,Americana,Blues,Folk,Singer/Songwriter
Ticket Prices
General Admission
$20
VIP Suite -Includes 10 tickets
$300
Event Schedule
Cory Chisel
8:00 PM
Justin Townes Earle
9:00 PM
Cory Chisel | 8:00 PM
Old Believer \ Old b?-l ev?r\ n 1 : one who has been through a lot in their life and hasn’t lost hope 2 : one who doesn’t feel cynical and still feels connected to the world that we’re living in but is wise enough to know a thing or two about it 3 : OLD SOUL

Cory Chisel is an old believer. You can hear it in his music – there’s a wisdom beyond his years in that voice. You can see it in his story – the son of a preacher, sheltered from pop music, raised on hymns and Johnny Cash. “Mom played piano and organ, my dad did the preaching, the thing that my sister and I could add to the service was to sing.” As fate would have it, the kid was born to do it.

He grew up in the iron range town of Babbit Minnesota, and the rural flatlands of Appleton Wisconsin. Along with the family’s spiritual doctrine came a musician uncle, who taught Cory about the blues: Howlin Wolf, Robert Johnson, Sony Boy Williamson.

This musical education put young Cory on a path that was well worn by the greats who came before him and influenced him. People like Cash, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, Sam Cooke, and Otis Redding. For Cory, songwriting is a byproduct of existing. We all talk to ourselves. Cory does so with a melody. Those internal conversations are the seeds, the building blocks of his songs. “Where a painter, in order to express himself, would reach for a canvas and paints, I go to the guitar and try to build it out. Or sometimes songs just come fully formed, usually if I’m really sleep-deprived and driving for whatever reason, it’s like a radio station that my brain picks up.”

Old Believer is the second LP from Cory Chisel & The Wandering Sons. The record, in Cory’s words, is about rebuilding, and there’s a directness that comes through in the songwriting. “Life is a series of creating things, living with the inevitable destruction of those things, and then finding within yourself the ability to create again.”

There’s brutal honesty in the soulful rock of “I’ve Been Accused”. The song suggests that sometimes with personal growth comes unhappiness, but ultimately you’ve got to step up. No pain, no gain. “Never Meant To Love You” is timeless, like something straight out of “The Great American Songbook.” It’s a story of unexpected love, plainly and elegantly told. For “Please Tell Me” Cory says “I went to my guitar instead of going to a phone and sent the message that way.” “Seventeen” deals beautifully with the simple truth of realizing that a certain portion of your life has passed. Cory Chisel is an old believer.

The album was recorded in Nashville and produced by a great singer songwriter in his own right, Brendan Benson (The Raconteurs). The two met while making Cory’s first album. They sat down to write a song together, and quickly found they were kindred spirits. “We had just such a common language in the way we attacked music making. Brendan is really great at bringing direction and bringing something out of me that is almost indescribable. He’s also the guy who can get behind the boards and pull it off.”

What Benson pulls off is an album of rich, authentic, rock and roll, drawing a straight line between the gospel and the blues of Cory’s youth, and classic rock. He’s able to find the right space and color for each song, whether it’s the dangerous and dark mood of “Foxgloves”, the bright Brill Building meets Graham Nash vibe of “Laura”, or the straight up traditional rollin’ and tumbin’ blues of “Over Jordan”.

The sound is filled out by a great cast of Nashville players including Matt Scibilia, Jon Graboff and Brad Pemberton of The Cardinals (Ryan Adams) and The Howlin Brothers. But the thing that truly brings this record to life is Chisel’s long time keyboard player and singing partner Adriel Harris. Their voices fit together magically. It’s a fitting nod to her contribution that Harris opens Old Believers with the gorgeous prologue- “This Is How It Goes.”

“I think one of the best things about being a songwriter and about living a life as an artist is that you really don’t get rid of anything, you kind of just like drag it with you the rest of your life and hopefully you can feel that on this record. We’re still dancing with those same inspired moments. This record is a culmination of all that.” more >>>
On a rainy Nashville Thursday last October, Justin Townes Earle leapt onstage at the famed Ryman Auditorium to accept the 2011 Americana Music Award for Song of the Year. The triumphant evening capped a turbulent twelve months for the gifted young musician categorized by significant hardship as well as notable achievement including debut performances at New York’s Carnegie Hall and on The Late Show with David Letterman.

Just one week later, Earle retreated to the western mountains of North Carolina to record his next album, Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now – an intriguing title given the importance of change in Earle’s approach to art. “I think it’s the job of the artist to be in transition and constantly learning more,” he says. “The new record is completely different than my last one, Harlem River Blues. This time I’ve gone in a Memphis-soul direction.”

Those who’ve followed Earle’s growth since releasing his debut EP Yuma in 2007 won’t be surprised he’s shooting off in another direction. For an artist whose list of influences runs the gamut from Randy Newman to Woody Guthrie, Chet Baker to the Replacements, and Phil Ochs to Bruce Springsteen, categories are useless.

“Great songs are great songs,” Earle says. “If you listen to a lot of soul music, especially the Stax Records stuff, the chord progressions are just like country music. And just like country music, soul music began in the church, so it has its roots in the same place.”

Perhaps then it’s also not surprising Earle chose a converted church in Asheville, NC to record Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now. Recorded completely live (no overdubs) over a four-day period with Harlem River Blues co-producer Skylar Wilson, the album sheds the rockabilly bravado of previous records in favor of a confident, raw, and vulnerable sound. Says Earle, “the whole idea was to record everything live, making everything as real as it could be, and putting something out there that will hopefully stand the test of time and space.”

The result: songs like “Down on the Lower East Side” and “Unfortunately, Anna” are equally timely and timeless. The former finds Earle channeling Closing Time era Tom Waits while the latter echoes the dirges of Springsteen’s Darkness on the Edge of Town. That said, gentle heartbreakers like the album’s title track and “Am I That Lonely Tonight” are uniquely Earle, solidifying his role as one of his generation’s greatest songwriters.

Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now comes out
March 27th via Bloodshot Records. more >>>