Eddie Owen Presents: Glen Phillips with Hoot & Holler
Live @ Red Clay Music Foundry Friday April 20th, 2018 at 8 pm
Doors open 7:00 PM
Glen Phillips from Toad the Wet Sprocket!

Premium seating: $24 ($27 day of)
Reserved seating: $20 ($23 day of)

Glen Phillips has always been a courageous and inviting songwriter. During his years as lead singer of Toad the Wet Sprocket, the band’s elegant folk/pop sound and his honest, introspective lyrics helped them forge a close bond with their fans.

Since starting his solo career, Phillips has pared his music down to its emotional core, concentrating on the simple truths of love and relationships, with a profound spiritual understanding. Swallowed by the New takes on life’s difficult transitions and delivers some of the Phillips' most vulnerable songs. “I made this album during the dissolution of a 23 year marriage, Phillips says. “A major chapter of my life was coming to a close, and I discovered early on that I had to work hard to get through the transition with compassion and clarity. These songs were a big part of that process.”

The album was recorded in May of 2015 with producer/bass player Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams), Jay Bellerose (drums), Chris Bruce (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keys) and Ruby Amanfu (vocals).
The folk hymn Grief and Praise was inspired by writer Martin Prechtel who maintains that “grief is praising those things we love and have lost, and praise is grieving those things we love and will lose”.

It sums up the philosophy of the record in no uncertain terms:“For all that you love will be taken some day / By the angel of death or the servants of change / In a floodwater tide without rancor or rage / So sing loud while you're able / In grief and in praise”Swallowed by the New is full of the inviting melodies that have always marked Phillips’ work, while his singing reaches a new degree of intimacy and immediacy.

The arrangements hint at country, soul, folk, rock and classic pop, without ever sounding derivative. The emotions may be raw, but they are guided by Phillips’ steady vocals towards healing and renewal.

Phillips started Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, when he was still in high school. He was as surprised as anyone when their low-key folk rock landed them on the pop charts. When the band members decided to go their separate ways, Phillips began a solo career with Abulum followed by Winter Pays for Summer, Mr. Lemons and Secrets of the New Explorers.

Always open to new projects and unlikely collaborations, he’s toured and recorded with Works Progress Administration, a band that included members of Nickel Creek, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Elvis Costello’s Attractions; Mutual Admiration Society with Nickel Creek; Remote Tree Children, an experimental project with John Askew and Plover, with Neilson Hubbard and Garrison Starr. His acoustic duo tour to support Swallowed by the Newstarts in October and will continue through the spring of 2017.

“I enjoy the spontaneity of acoustic performance, where I can take the show wherever it needs to go and follow the lead of an audience instead of following a set list. There’s more talking, more stories, and more of a loose feel. The subject matter is on the serious side, but I feel like the perspective is ultimately positive. Life is about changes, no matter how we may try and pretend otherwise. This album is all about learning how to face change.” more >>>
In early 2013, a mutual love of American folk music brought Amy Alvey (fiddle, guitar) and Mark Kilianski (guitar, banjo) together.

They call themselves Hoot and Holler as a nod to the “hootenanny” song gatherings during the folk revival of the 1960s, while also hinting at the infectious energy that occurs during a barn dance in the south.

After cutting their teeth in Boston’s burgeoning roots music scene for two and a half years, they could not help but heed the call of the open road, and spent the better part of 2016 touring nationally while living in their camper van "Irene". Ever inspired by the enduring spirit of traditional Appalachian mountain music, they now call Asheville, North Carolina their home.

Their songwriting comes across as simple, honest, and fresh to the ears. Fans of tight duo harmonies will love the tender harmonizing between Amy and Mark that falls in line with masters like Gillian Welch and Dave Rawlings. Both are Berklee College of Music alumni, and the listener can expect the polished technique of conservatory training, in tandem with the grit, drive, and soul of musicians like Bill Monroe or Ola Belle Reed.

Their new full-length album "Reasons To Run" plays like a sonic cross-country road trip. The album starts off with a cajun groove harkening to the Louisiana swamps, while "Too Many Reasons To Run" was inspired by the sparse beauty of the Southwestern desert.

With other geographical references to Virginia, New Orleans, and Kentucky, Hoot and Holler invite you to experience their soundscapes, described as a "fresh and distinctive blend that can only be earned the hard way - through thousands of miles and hundreds of nights on the road." -Patrick Coman, WUMB's Local Folk more >>>
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