Wednesday April 16, 2014 | 8:00PM
Exit/In (Get Directions)
Mac Demarco w/ Juan Wauters & JP5
When the then 21-year old Mac DeMarco released his debut Rock and Roll Night Club 12? just a short while ago in the Spring of 2012, it was accompanied by a barrage of bizarrely funny promo videos, wildly unhinged live performances and a not-so-subtle disparate range of promo photos. The glam facade was purely that, an image that was manufactured for fun to confuse the stiff and compartmentalizing world of indie music journalists. But it wasn’t all a jest, as that EP covered a whole range of music styles that were latent in the ex-Makeout Videotape frontman’s already impressive slough of cassette-only releases. The sincere and warm Mac who sang “Only You” was the same lipstick-wearing sleazoid that crooned “Baby’s Wearing Blue Jeans” and that suited him and his listeners just fine.

Event Schedule

JP5

9:00 PM

Juan Wauters

9:45 PM

Mac Demarco

10:30 PM


JP5 | 9:00 PM
JP5 - the Joseph Punket Five

Joseph Plunket, Jem Cohen, Cy Barkley, Adam Meisterhans & Rachel Hortman more >>>
Juan Wauters | 9:45 PM
In 2000, Alberto Wauters left Uruguay to live in a basement in Queens. Two years later he called his son, Juan, to join him. Juan Wauters crossed the threshold into manhood when he arrived in New York. Working at a factory, the father and son pooled their money to bring their family to the borough of opportunity. With no friends to speak of, Juan turned to music to take control of the loneliness of his isolation. Juan was inspired by his new neighborhood of Jackson Heights and delighted to find that his library card gave him access to an abundance of new music.

In his debut solo record, N.A.P. North-American Poetry, Wauters dreams big; coming into his own as a singer. Building on his songwriting, popularized by The Beets, Juan presents introspective tracks, like “Water and Sanity”, and reflections on humans’ relationship with technology in songs like “Breathing“—which features Carmelle Safdie. The record is completed, as always, by the artwork of dear friend and longtime collaborator Matthew Volz, who has honed the trademark visual aesthetic of Juan’s music. This album is a selection of recordings made between the fall of 2010 and the summer of 2012 at Marlborough Farms. _N.A.P._ delivers a fresh sound and lyrical candor from one of Queens’ most idiosyncratic adoptive sons.

Live, Juan shares the stage with a revolving cast of international musicians of the highest caliber: vocalist Carmelle Safdie (Israel), multi-instrumentalist Tall Juan Zaballa (Argentina), percussionist Chie Mori (Japan), and flutist Amanda Rodi (Mexico). Matthew Volz heightens this lively and mood-altering experience with his painted banners, personal objects and manually manipulated light show. The ensemble is not to be missed. more >>>
Mac Demarco | 10:30 PM
When the then 21-year old Mac DeMarco released his debut Rock and Roll Night Club 12? just a short while ago in the Spring of 2012, it was accompanied by a barrage of bizarrely funny promo videos, wildly unhinged live performances and a not-so-subtle disparate range of promo photos. The glam facade was purely that, an image that was manufactured for fun to confuse the stiff and compartmentalizing world of indie music journalists. But it wasn’t all a jest, as that EP covered a whole range of music styles that were latent in the ex-Makeout Videotape frontman’s already impressive slough of cassette-only releases. The sincere and warm Mac who sang “Only You” was the same lipstick-wearing sleazoid that crooned “Baby’s Wearing Blue Jeans” and that suited him and his listeners just fine.

Now, all of six months later, Mac is back with his first proper full length, Mac DeMarco 2. As opposed to RNRNC, “2? is a concerted effort to produce a cohesive work that showcases Mac’s natural ability as a songwriter, singer and producer. With a new arsenal of recording gear, the fidelity has substantially improved without compromising the immediacy and organic quality of his prior releases under any monicker. The results are immediately rewarding, from the warm “Cooking Up Something Good” to the heartfelt “My Kind of Woman.” It’s obvious Mac is presenting himself musically in the most sincere way possible, no matter what happens in his wild videos or live shows. “Freaking out the Neighborhood,” Mac’s apologetic ode to his loved ones about such public behavior, shows that Mac DeMarco is still with us, coming along for the ride, getting everyone else in trouble. Even so, the maturation process of Mac DeMarco, recording artist, is in full swing. He did, after all, turn 22 this April. more >>>